A Prime Example of Baptist Liturgy

Chapel at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary is an interesting exercise in Baptist liturgy? Baptists? Liturgy? Aren’t those mutually exclusive? I would argue they are not. There are many denomination who practice traditional liturgical services with the reciting of Scripture and Creeds. I have several friends who are Presbyterian who find this style of worship to be the best way that they can praise and glorify God.

We Baptists (and many other evangelical denominations) have our own style of liturgy. At Southwestern in chapel the liturgy consists of: 2 songs, announcements, prayer, public reading of Scripture, special music, and a sermon. This format is followed more or less to a “t” for every chapel service. Sometime there is an extra congregational song tossed in or the order might be a bit different, but the content is ALWAYS the same.

We are comfortable with the familiar and for many, familiarity makes it easier to focus on worship. However, there are others who fall into the trap of simply going through the motions and losing site of true worship.

In conclusion, liturgy is good. However, liturgy must not be so rigid that it hampers the movement of the Spirit. Also, it is occasionally good to get out of our worship “comfort zones” so that we do not become complacent. For a Baptist, this might mean going to a traditional liturgical service at another denomination’s church. For those who are traditionally liturgical, it might mean attending worship at a Baptist church.

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4 thoughts on “A Prime Example of Baptist Liturgy

  1. A most fascinating post…. I’m building an online ecumencial chapel, which is liturgical in nature, and about 30% of our members are Baptist. For the most part they find the liturgy quite different initially, and then sort of cool, at least by the comments so far. Yet, there are those who would like to see more spontaneity, and change from time to time too.

    Your quote: “In conclusion, liturgy is good. However, liturgy must not be so rigid that it hampers the movement of the Spirit.”:is something we struggle with a bit, in part due to technology, and in part due to our significant ecumenical variation. Its an interative thing…. we don’t want to squelch the moving of the spirit for our Baptist and Pentecostal members, nor offend our Lutheran or Catholic members by going too far off the liturgy text.

    Your statement: “We Baptists (and many other evangelical denominations) have our own style of liturgy. At Southwestern in chapel the liturgy consists of: 2 songs, announcements, prayer, public reading of Scripture, special music, and a sermon. This format is followed more or less to a “t” for every chapel service. Sometime there is an extra congregational song tossed in or the order might be a bit different, but the content is ALWAYS the same.” is something I can use to help our Baptist members understand, we are not so different. Thanks for much for the insight.

    God bless you and I’ll likely be sending folks your way for some cool reading 🙂
    Ron

  2. I am so glad that Baptists are embracing the concept of a Liturgy. I myself am from a Baptist backround and after I went through a spell of Alternitive Christianity I converted to Catholicism, (I find that their cannon of scripture has a better arguement for being authentic than the Prodestant cannon and they observe The early church Fathers better.) Now I am a Traditional Catholic in a Novus Ordo church. I have pride in the fact now that a sinner as great as I, ( I sadly must struggle with porn in day to day life.) Now has the privlidge to stand up and say that Christ is the one who redeemed us and not our own works and that his sacrifice on Calvery is made present in the mass and ought to be shown the respect and reverence that is due the King of Kings.

    Praised be Jesus christ Now and Forever more!

    Martin

    1. You don’t believe in grace alone.I hope your works are good enough for you to merit heaven. i don’t know how you can go to sleep at night. I know that if my
      salvation is dependent in any way on my good works, I am in serious trouble.
      But I rest in God’s grace; “It does not , therefore, depend on man’s desire or
      effort, but on God’s mercy.”

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